almost entirely anti-oppression blogging with a personal passion for girlmonstering, art, and disruptive fashion

she/her pronouns

this blog is not for cishet white boys

I tag pretty much everything and tend to add commentary in the tags, but you have to open the posts for them
»structural ugliness
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heyfunniest:

is this even a kid show

i mean not really I think kids like watching it cos it’s colorful and fun but I dunno that the writing is strictly oriented at kids to the extent that it used to be

it’s at least towards the older side of the kids spectrum

(Source: thespoonmissioner)

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Anonymous asked : My white friend trying to argue for reverse racism SOS

wocgettalkin:

This struggle is so real bc it’s like 

"Yo. White friend. I trusted you. You’re supposed to be my friend and try to understand shit but like can I even call you my friend right now.”

So then it’s like okay… I see this person’s true colors… are they still my friend or nah? 

We literally all have that person/those people.

-Monica

chocolate-covered-chaos:

Ikea Monkey Oil on Canvas

chocolate-covered-chaos:

Ikea Monkey
Oil on Canvas

therealbenyonce:

me neither 

therealbenyonce:

me neither 

(Source: welovekanyewest)

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arabellesicardi:

Most Important Ugly opens on Friday! These are just outtakes — process shots. Tomorrow (later today, really) Tayler & I will drop the official press release and some of the photos that will be at the exhibition so you can get more of an idea as to what we’ve been working on for the past six months. Excited. 

The first person is Megan and the longest interview (I interview each sitter using a series of questions that informs the process of makeup and then Tayler shoots them after I’m done pulling their ugly out) — we talked a lot about Maggie Nelson, love and trauma, blue and gender dysphoria. The second one is my life muse Indigo, the leading lady of the project. 

Anyway. I’ll talk more about the project tomorrow. Hope you’re stoked.

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Anonymous asked : What's your opinion on Eleanor & Park?

elloellenoh:

Ah, I’ve been wondering when I’d get this question. I admit that I’ve not been very vocal about my feelings on this book because as a fellow author, I don’t feel comfortable speaking negatively about another author’s book. But at the same time I have developed a growing angst over this subject and I will try to put it into words for you. When I first heard of the book, it was through friends who thought I’d be interested in the portrayal of a half-Korean boy. Of course I was! I bought it right away for my daughter. It sounded like a perfect teenage love story. I even recommended it to a friend of mine (non-Korean) who loved it. But then another friend of mine asked me if I had any problems with the depiction of Park and his mother and I hurriedly picked it up before my daughter could read it. Here’s the thing, it IS a lovely little teenage love story. But all I could keep thinking was, Damn it! Why did he have to be Korean? Why did this boy, who is so filled with self-loathing and contempt for his heritage, have to be Korean? Why did his mother with her sing songy broken English have to be Korean?

And because of this, I ended up giving this book away to someone I felt would enjoy it better, a non-Korean. Because I didn’t want my daughter to read this and get that same icky feeling I did. That same humiliating sinking feeling you get when you realize you’ve stumbled across an awful stereotype of a Korean and you cringe that this is all that anyone takes away. And why oh why of all books that could possibly have a diverse main character did it have to be this one that hits the NYT list? Why did Rowell have to include the worst racist comment in the world in this book and think it is okay? Because when Eleanor thinks it, she also at least recognized it was racist. I’m sure that’s why she thought it was ok to include the most racist comment against Asians. But I flinched when I read it. I was so angry when I read it. I hated Eleanor after I read it and I never ever forgave her. No, Asians don’t see things smaller because our eyes are smaller. That is racist. It’s an interesting point to make that you can fall in love with a person of a different culture and still be racist. That’s ultimately Eleanor.

But Park and his mother are more problematic. His mother is described as a chinadoll - a slur in itself. And Park just hates the fact that he doesn’t look more white like his brother. He is filled with self loathing to the point where he even says Asian men are not sexy. SAYS WHO?!! There was a period in my life when I was younger where I pushed away my culture and wished I wasn’t Korean. This was in direct correlation with the amount of racism I endured at the time. So I could understand Park, I could relate to him. But then I FOUND myself! I found my respect and love and pride for my culture. And I recognized just how important my Korean heritage was to me. Park never has that moment of self-discovery. And that is the greatest failure of this book. Because Rowell did not take the opportunity to really understand what it means to be multi-cultural. She wrote a character purely from a white person’s view, never thinking about how a minority person growing up in this country truly feels. The anguish of racism and the complexity of living between two different cultures was never explored. Instead, we are left to believe that Park goes through the rest of his life filled with contempt for his mother’s heritage. A person who wished he was white instead of Asian. And I find myself desperately wishing he’d been white too.

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"But what we should know from the situation of gay people of all colours and black people of all sexual preferences is that simply being a victim does not radicalize your consciousness. If that was the case, we would all be fighting the revolution right now together and he fact is we’re not because people want their particular form of victimhood to end with caring about what the implications of that are for other people…We have to move past the idea that our sexual preferences will radicalize our consciousness. Essentialized identity, whether it is race or sex, sexuality, etc. and the notion that just being the victim of something will enlighten you is also the big lie now."
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fauxcyborg:

fm-dial-style:

shopcatsca:

fauxcyborg:

mktbone:

fauxcyborg:

but goddamn terry richardson really is emblematic of how mediocre a white man can be but he’ll still be shielded from accusations of assault because of his ‘art’

What fucking art? The $50 ugly-ass nylon jumpsuits that come…

I honestly don’t see what is wrong with that? A service in exchange for a service? He asked her. He did not force her. If she replied yes she would not have been forced into it. 

Because models are regularly taken advantage of and many of them enter the industry as 14, 15 year old girls? Because models don’t have the right to organize/unionize currently? Because Terry Richardson holds an incredible amount of power in the industry and very few models have power yet their labor is critical? Because Terry Richardson is commonly understood to have sexually assaulted women and girls in the past? 

It isn’t ‘asking’ if there is the implication that he could destroy your career, it isn’t asking when speaking out against someone who’s commonly understood to be able to silence any model who doesn’t say yes. It isn’t asking when despite the fact that numerous women have spoken out against Richardson he still has the clout to take portraits of anyone from President Obama to Miley Cyrus. 

(Source: showstudio)

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fauxcyborg:

the biggest lie ever told is that it is SUCH a tragedy that so many innocents are ruined by charges of rape and pedophilia. 

no. the truth is that so many people never see their rapist face accountability in any sort of way for their actions, never see their rapist treated with half the scorn survivors deal with, that people never feel comfortable enough to tell anyone what happened to them. 

but victims and survivors never truly get to be innocent, there are always people looking to understand why we deserved what happened to us. 

(Source: ffuku)

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(Source: ridodipaura)

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aaron-symons:

Tilda Swinton photographed by Alasdair McLellan

aaron-symons:

Tilda Swinton photographed by Alasdair McLellan